Posted on

What Are the Consequences of a Misdemeanor?

What will happen if I am charged with a misdemeanor? What happens after a misdemeanor conviction? Can I go to college after a misdemeanor conviction?
These and many other important questions are asked when dealing with a misdemeanor charge. Unfortunately, many people don’t fully understand the consequences of a misdemeanor conviction in Wisconsin. A conviction for a misdemeanor – especially a violent or drug-related misdemeanor – can carry serious penalties and deeply impact your life.

What Is a Misdemeanor?

Wisconsin Law States that a misdemeanor offense is an offense for which the maximum possible penalty is 12 months or less jail. A misdemeanor offense could include:

Domestic violence, like battery or disorderly conduct
Operating While Intoxicated (OWI aka DUI)
Theft
Prostitution and solicitation, and
Resisting or obstructing arrest

Misdemeanor Sentences

A misdemeanor conviction could carry a significant sentence. A sentence could include jail time, probation and other consequences that may affect your finances and freedom. Community service, fines, and other obligations could be imposed on your by the court at sentencing.

Firearm Rights

Certain misdemeanor offenses can affect your firearm rights. Even though you haven’t been convicted of a felony, certain domestic abuse offenses may impose federal prohibitions on firearm possession.

Work or School Issues

If you are sentenced to jail or have other conditions imposed on you, it may be difficult to meet the expectations of your employment or school. Following a conviction, it may be hard to find suitable employment or gain acceptance into certain types of schooling or maintain certain professional licenses.

The Petit & Dommershausen, SC, team will work with you to mitigate or lessen the harsh consequences of a misdemeanor conviction. We can employ legal strategies to review your case for potential defenses, conduct assertive negotiations on your behalf, advise you on steps that may assist the resolution of your case, and obtain outcomes that may circumvent difficulties that may arise with a charge or conviction.