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Petit & Dommershausen Solar Panel

The Petit & Dommershausen law office solar panel installation is underway! Haven’t seen it yet? Drive by our Appleton Area office at 1650 Midway Road in Menasha  to see the solar panel.  Our firm is proud to have the opportunity to utilize solar technology in Northeast Wisconsin.  Renewable energy is the power supply of the future.  Did you know that by 2040, renewable energy is projected to equal coal and natural gas electricity generation. Curious about our project? Give us a call at 920-739-9900.

 

Solar Panel

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How do I resolve my loved one’s estate?

Lawyers Can Help You Resolve Your Loved One’s Estate

The passing of a loved one is one of the more difficult time period’s in life.  Petit & Dommershausen, SC can help you handle the Probate Process and resolution of your loved one’s estate so that you may focus on the fond memories of your loved one rather than court filings, deadlines, and legal paperwork.

What is Probate?

Formal and Informal Probate is the court supervised legal procedure used to transferring assets or the ownership of property following the passing of a deceased person.  The procedure includes the filing and validation of the deceased’s will, the distribution of assets and property under the direction of the will, and the resolution of any debts owed by the deceased.  An estate may proceed through Probate whether or not a person passes away with a will.  While probate may not be applicable in every case, the probate process may arise following the passing of a wealthy person or working class person. Ultimately, the legal procedure aims to resolve the debts owed by the deceased, the distribution to beneficiaries, and resolution of tax consequences that may arise following death.

Should I hire an Attorney?

A beneficiary or personal representative may hire a lawyer to assist with the probate process.  The lawyer who drafted the will for the deceased is not required to be hired by a beneficiary or the personal representative.  Lawyers can serve as a valuable resource for persons who are working to resolved a loved one’s estate following a death.  Your local register in probate may be able to help you with technical or small issues, but will be unable to provide legal advice.  Lawyers can provide you, in your role as personal representative, with advice regarding the probate process, opening an estate, notifying estate creditors, referring you to tax professionals, resolving claims against an estate, inventorying assets, selling or distributing assets, and closing an estate.

If you are working through the probate process and want to learn more about the assistance an attorney can provide, contact Petit & Dommershausen at 920-739-9900.
A blog post prepared by Attorney Nathan Wojan.

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Fighting a College Suspension or Expulsion

Worried about a college suspension?

Did you know that the Wisconsin Administrative Code permits UW System Universites and Colleges to suspend and/or expel students for violations of the student code when the student is on campus or off campus? You heard that right, the administration can punish you for something that doesn’t happen at school.  If you are in College, you should be aware of the following information!

Administrators at the University of Wisconsin – Green Bay (UW-Green Bay UWGB) or the University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh (UW Oshkosh UWO), or any of the other UW Schools, have the power to discipline students for activity that happens in an off-campus apartment, home, tavern or bar, or anywhere else.

In fact, the administration has the power to investigate and discipline students for conduct on or outside university lands.  If an administration official believes that:

  • (a) The conduct constitutes or would constitute a serious criminal offense, regardless of the existence of any criminal proceedings.
  • (b) The conduct indicates that the student presented or may present a danger or threat to the health or safety of himself, herself or others.
  • (c) The conduct demonstrates a pattern of behavior that seriously impairs the university’s ability to fulfill its teaching, research, or public service missions.

then the administration has the power to issue discipline. A student could be banned from certain campus areas, suspended from school, or expelled from all Wisconsin Universities or Colleges.

The process may start with a request for a meeting at the Dean of Students office.  A lawyer can help you prepare for this meeting and can attend with you.  Keeping a student status is valuable for every student’s future.  Students should be prepared for each step of a Dean of Student’s investigation.  While the process may start with what seems like a harmless meeting at the Dean of Student’s office, it may proceed towards serious sanctions or even a loss of the ability to attend your University or College of choice.

You have the capability to consult an Attorney!  Call Petit & Dommershausen Law Office today.  Ask for Attorney Nathan Wojan or one of the other lawyers at the firm.  Your future is important, let P&D provide you with the help that you need.

UWS 17.09Conduct subject to disciplinary action. In accordance with s. UWS 17.08, the university may discipline a student for engaging in, attempting to engage in, or assisting others to engage in any of the following types of nonacademic misconduct:
(1) Dangerous conduct. Conduct that endangers or threatens the health or safety of oneself or another person.
(2) Sexual assault. Conduct defined in s. 940.225, Stats.
(3) Stalking. Conduct defined in s. 940.32, Stats.
(4) Harassment. Conduct defined in s. 947.013, Stats.
(5)Hazing. Conduct defined in s. 948.51, Stats.
(6) Illegal use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of alcohol or controlled substances. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of alcoholic beverages or of marijuana, narcotics, or other controlled substances, except as expressly permitted by law or university policy.
(7) Unauthorized use of or damage to property. Unauthorized possession of, use of, moving of, tampering with, damage to, or destruction of university property or the property of others.
(8) Disruption of university-authorized activities. Conduct that obstructs or impairs university-run or university-authorized activities, or that interferes with or impedes the ability of a person to participate in university-run or university-authorized activities.
(9) Forgery or falsification. Unauthorized possession of or fraudulent creation, alteration, or misuse of any university or other governmental document, record, key, electronic device, or identification.
(10) Misuse of computing resources. Conduct that involves any of the following:
(a) Failure to comply with laws, license agreements, and contracts governing university computer network, software, and hardware use.
(b) Use of university computing resources for unauthorized commercial purposes or personal gain.
(c) Failure to protect a personal password or university-authorized account.
(d) Breach of computer security, invasion of privacy, or unauthorized access to university computing resources.
(11) False statement or refusal to comply regarding a university matter. Making a knowingly false oral or written statement to any university employee or agent of the university regarding a university matter, or refusal to comply with a reasonable request on a university matter.
(12) Violation of criminal law. Conduct that constitutes a criminal offense as defined by state or federal law.
(13) Serious and repeated violations of municipal law. Serious and repeated off-campus violations of municipal law.
(14) Violation of ch. UWS 18. Conduct that violates ch. UWS 18, including, but not limited to, provisions regulating fire safety, theft, and dangerous weapons.
(15) Violation of university rules. Conduct that violates any published university rules, regulations, or policies, including provisions contained in university contracts with students.
(16) Noncompliance with disciplinary sanctions. Conduct that violates a sanction, requirement, or restriction imposed in connection with previous disciplinary action.
(17) Dating violence. Violence committed by a student against another person with whom they are in a “dating relationship” as defined in s. 813.12 (1) (ag), Stats.
(18) Domestic violence. Conduct defined as “domestic abuse” in ss. 813.12 (1) (am) and 968.075, Stats.
(19) Sexual Harassment. Conduct defined in s. 111.32 (13), Stats., or as defined in Board of Regent Policy that addresses sexual harassment
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Dads and Divorce | Child Custody | Divorce Lawyers

“A father’s love is just as important to a child’s development as a mother’s, and sometimes more so, suggests a new review of about 100 studies published between 1949 and 2001.

Researchers found that, overall, the love — or rejection — of mothers and fathers equally affects kids’ behavior, self-esteem, emotional stability, and mental health. “But in some cases, the withdrawal of a father’s love seems to play a bigger role in kids’ problems with personality and psychological adjustment, delinquency, and substance abuse,” says study coauthor Ronald P. Rohner, Ph.D., director of the Center for the Study of Parental Acceptance and Rejection at the University of Connecticut in Storrs. And for others, the presence of a father’s love may do more to boost children’s sense of well-being and improve their emotional and physical health.”

An excerpt from an article by Sandra Y. Lee – found on Parents.Com 

Continue reading Dads and Divorce | Child Custody | Divorce Lawyers